Coppell Trainer Tip Archives - Page 2 of 50 -

Category Archives for "Coppell Trainer Tip"

Dec 16

Dress Right for Winter Exercise With These Layering Tips

Coppell Trainer Tip

Dress Right for Winter Exercise With These Layering Tips

Learn the best way to layer your clothes for cold weather exercise

 

By Elizabeth Quinn

Updated July 08, 2016

Cold weather doesn’t have to stop you from outdoor exercise, but it is important to dress for the conditions. If you want to take advantage of the exhilaration of winter exercise, learning how to dress for it will help keep you warm and comfortable while you get some fresh air and maintain your fitness.

How To Layer Clothing for Cold Weather Exercise

The best way to stay warm and dry during cold weather exercise is to learn how to properly layer your clothing.

By wearing clothing in a specific combination of layers, you will more easily regulate your body temperature, keep moisture away from your skin, and stay warm and dry even as you are working up a sweat.

The layers you wear for a given activity are matched to the weather, your activity level and your personal preference. There are essentially three layers to consider, and each has a specific function:

  1. The base layer: wicks moisture and perspiration away from your skin to keep you warm and dry.
  2. The mid layer: insulates and keeps you warm
  3. The outer layer: allows moisture to escape while blocking wind, and repelling water.

The Base Layer

The base layer is in contact with your skin. A tight fitting and wicking material is best to keep you warm and dry. Polypropylene, silk, polyester, Thermax, Thinsulate, and wool are all good choices Avoid cotton because it traps moisture, so it stays wet and draws heat from you.

Base layers come in various weights (lightweight, midweight and heavyweight). Select a weight based on the outside temperature and your activity level. The lighter weight is better at wicking, the heavyweight has more insulation.

The Mid Layer

The Mid layer provides insulation. It should be a bit looser than the base layer, but to function properly it needs to maintain contact with the base layer.

Mid layers also carry moisture away from the base layer to the outer layer. Common material for mid layers include down, polyester, fleece, wool and newer synthetic / natural blends. Many mid layer clothing has extras such as pit zips, long front zippers, adjustable cuffs and collars.

The Outer Layer

The outer layer blocks wind and allows moisture to escape. Typical outer layers include shells made of Gore-Tex or a similar material. Extras such as pit zips, ankle zippers (for pants), and a variety of ventilation options are standard. Outer layers should also be tough enough to withstand tears and abrasions. Other less high-tech options may include wind resistant materials, or water resistant fabrics.

Once you have a layering plan, you can adjust your temperature control simply by removing or adding layers as needed.

Another tip for maintaining the life of your clothing is to follow the care instructions on the item. Synthetic, technical fabrics need to be cleaned properly in order to wick, insulate and repel water.

Special cleaning products can restore the moisture wicking and water repellent properties if necessary.

Head, Hands, and Feet

After your core is covered, you need to properly dress your extremities. Wear a hat, mittens or gloves, socks, and shoes or boots that match your activity and weather conditions. To cool yourself if you overheat, you can often just remove your hat or gloves. Keep in mind that wind blocking fabric is also important for hats and gloves. Although fleece is warm it does not provide protection from wind.

Proper layering, along with eating for cold weather exercise, will not only make you more comfortable during winter activity, but it also keeps you safe.

Dec 11

10 Steps to Achieve Any Goal

Coppell Trainer Tip

10 Steps to Achieve Any Goal

Heart. Intelligence. Courage.

They’re all valuable traits, but they pale in comparison to what each of us needs most in the quest to total life success: Personal accountability is No. 1.

 

Surely you will recall meeting Dorothy, the Scarecrow, the Tin Man and the Cowardly Lion from the 1939 movie The Wizard of Oz, based on L. Frank Baum’s classic children’s novel. All of the main characters are thrust into despairing circumstances beyond their control. A tornado rips Dorothy from her Kansas farm and hurls her against her will to a strange fantasy world. The Scarecrow lives a stagnant life amid corn and crows because his creator skimped on brains. The Tin Man is rusted in place, unable to act because he lacks the heart to move. And the lovable Cowardly Lion? He lacks courage and nerve, and therefore lives a life well below his potential.

Feeling victimized by shortcomings and circumstances, the characters believe they cannot possibly change things on their own, so they set off on the yellow brick road to the Land of Oz in hopes of finding an all-powerful wizard who will solve all of life’s problems for them.

At the heart of their message and ours lies this one simple principle: Don’t let your circumstances define who you are and what you do.

In other words, don’t place the hope of future success in the hands of some wizard’s wand. Relying on someone or something to save you only brings a sense of victimization that paralyzes your ability to think clearly, creatively and quickly. Instead, take charge of shaping your own circumstances, and good, positive, game-changing things will begin to happen.

Whether you’re looking to make wholesale changes in your life or just want to fine-tune it a little, here are 10 guidelines—highlights from our newest book, The Wisdom of Oz—that will help you unleash the power of personal accountability to take ownership for your actions, decisions, successes and failures.

1) Redefine accountability.
Does the mere mention of the word accountability make you shudder? The negative (and uninspiring) view of accountability is reinforced in the common dictionary definition: “Subject to having to report, explain or justify; being answerable, responsible.”

Staying true to yourself and your goals should not be drudgery. You must view your accountability as a gift to yourself, a voluntary mindset to ensure success, not something you’re force-feeding yourself even though you hate it.

2) Think as if your life depended on it.
When you shift to a determined, creative mindset, you begin to discover solutions for challenges that you may have believed were out of your control. If your life depended on it, would you come up with a new idea or strategy to save yourself? Absolutely.

The goal you want to achieve or the problem you want to solve probably is not a life-or-death scenario, but many creative solutions come when you put everything on the line. While your life may not be at risk, your happiness and success are.

3) When you can’t control your circumstances, don’t let your circumstances control you.
On March 22, 2012, the state army of Mali stormed the presidential palace, overthrowing the western African country’s 20-year-old democracy. In the turmoil, Islamic militants took control of two-thirds of the country and crushed the upcoming democratic elections.

It was a tragic moment when the coup happened, says Yeah Samake, mayor of the small town of Ouélessébougou, located approximately 40 miles from the chaos. “I came into my living room and completely collapsed on the couch. My wife came and kicked me. I couldn’t believe it. I told her, ‘I am looking for sympathy here. Why are you kicking me?’ She only said, ‘Get out there and go do something.’ ”

Whether you get off the couch on your own or require a little nudge from somewhere else, the point is to get out there and do something.

4) You’ve got to want it more than you don’t want it.
Everything will exact a certain price from you—energy, effort, patience, resources. It’s natural to want the good things in life without paying the price: You want to lose weight but don’t want to exercise or sacrifice your favorite foods. You want a promotion but don’t want to put in the extra hours. Success comes when you hit a tipping point and begin to desire your goal more than you dread the cost of reaching it.

5) Don’t let gravity pull you down.
Just as massive planets produce gravity—drawing everything toward them—it seems that tough problems and challenging obstacles have enough mass to pull you away from getting what you want. This force gets bigger and stronger as the challenges get larger and tougher. Don’t give in.

6) Every breakthrough requires a bold stroke.
Actor Jim Carrey grew up so poor that his family lived in a van after his father lost his job; at one point the Carreys slept in a tent on a relative’s lawn. But Carrey believed in his own future and in the things that he wanted to accomplish in his life.

As the story goes, one night early in Carrey’s struggling comic career, he drove his beat-up Toyota to the Hollywood Hills and, while overlooking Los Angeles, pulled out his checkbook and wrote himself a check for $10 million. He scribbled in the notation line “For acting services rendered” and stuck it in his wallet. In that moment, Carrey cemented his personal resolve. Over the next five years, Carrey’s promise to himself led to worldwide fame. At the peak of his career, his per-film paycheck reached $20 million.

When you discover your own internal power, you see that you have the right, the ability, even the obligation, to create your own best reality.

7) Ask for feedback.
Soliciting advice and criticism from others creates accountability.

For this to work, you will need to convince the mentor, friend, colleague or significant other whom you’re appealing to that you want to know what he really thinks. The evaluator needs to know that he won’t suffer any blowback if he is totally honest. Feedback is key to overcoming blind spots and achieving better results.

8) Ask yourself, Am I a renter or an owner?
We care more for the things we own than for the things we rent because we don’t have as much invested in things that are temporary; there’s not as much at stake. Have you ever washed a rental car? Of course not.

When you own something—whether it’s a car, a work assignment or a relationship—you make an investment, usually involving some degree of sacrifice. When you rent, you can walk away without losing anything. If you’re really committed to achieving your goal, go all in.

9) Prepare to move a lot of dirt.
Finding solutions is just like digging for gold. Have you seen the Discovery Channel reality show Gold Rush? It follows the lives of modern-day miners as they compete against time, one another and nature in hopes of striking it rich. First the miners must remove a top layer of 6 to 12 feet of dirt and rocks before the real mining even starts. Below this seemingly worthless and painful 6 to 12 feet, they hit pay dirt. The more pay dirt the miners process, the more gold they potentially find. In the end, they must move several tons of dirt to find just 1 ounce of gold. It’s hard work, but it yields rich rewards.

Their bottom-line secret to success: Keep digging.

10) Make it happen!
How do you do that? How do you really make personal accountability work for you? Wouldn’t it be easy if there were just some switch you could flip? An Easy Button you could push? Maybe an app you could use? Well, there really is a flipping magical switch-app-button. It’s called making a choice and acting on it.

You have the choice to fulfill your aspirations or wallow in the blame game and victim cycle.

True success doesn’t come from the outside but from within. There is no wizard. Taking greater personal accountability is the key to succeeding in everything you do.

Dec 04

4 Tips for Setting Powerful Goals

Coppell Trainer Tip

4 Tips for Setting Powerful Goals

The most important benefit of setting goals isn’t achieving your goal; it’s what you do and the person you become in order to achieve your goal that’s the real benefit.

Goal setting is powerful because it provides focus. It shapes our dreams. It gives us the ability to hone in on the exact actions we need to perform to achieve everything we desire in life. Goals are great because they cause us to stretch and grow in ways that we never have before. In order to reach our goals, we must become better.

Life is designed in such a way that we look long-term and live short-term. We dream for the future and live in the present. Unfortunately, the present can produce many difficult obstacles. But setting goals provides long-term vision in our lives. We all need powerful, long-range goals to help us get past those short-term obstacles. Fortunately, the more powerful our goals are, the more we’ll be able to act on and guarantee that they will actually come to pass.

What are the key aspects to learn and remember when studying and writing our goals? Here’s a closer look at goal setting and how you can make it forceful and practical:

1. Evaluate and reflect.
The only way we can reasonably decide what we want in the future and how we’ll get there is to know where we are right now and what our current level of satisfaction is. So first, take some time to think through and write down your current situation; then ask this question on each key point: Is that OK?

The purpose of evaluation is twofold. First, it gives you an objective way to look at your accomplishments and your pursuit of the vision you have for life. Secondly, it shows you where you are so you can determine where you need to go. Evaluation gives you a baseline to work from.

Take a couple of hours this week to evaluate and reflect. See where you are and write it down so that as the months progress and you continue a regular time of evaluation and reflection, you will see just how much ground you’re gaining—and that will be exciting!

2. Define your dreams and goals.
One of the amazing things we have been given as humans is the unquenchable desire to have dreams of a better life and the ability to establish and set goals to live out those dreams. We can look deep within our hearts and dream of a better situation for ourselves and our families. We can dream of better financial, emotional, spiritual or physical lives. We have also been given the ability to not only dream, but pursue those dreams—and not just pursue them, but the cognitive ability to lay out a plan and strategies to achieve those dreams. Powerful!

What are your dreams and goals? This isn’t what you already have or what you have done, but what you want. Have you ever really sat down and thought through your life values and decided what you really want? Have you ever taken the time to truly reflect, to listen quietly to your heart, to see what dreams live within you? Your dreams are there. Everyone has them. They may live right on the surface, or they may be buried deep from years of others telling you they were foolish, but they are there.

Take time to be quiet. This is something that we don’t do enough of in this busy world of ours. We rush, rush, rush, and we’re constantly listening to noise all around us. The human heart was meant for times of quiet—to peer deep within. It is when we do this that our hearts are set free to soar and take flight on the wings of our own dreams. Schedule some quiet “dream time” this week. No other people. No cellphone. No computer. Just you, a pad, a pen and your thoughts.

Think about what really thrills you. When you are quiet, think about those things that really get your blood moving. What would you love to do, either for fun or for a living? What would you love to accomplish? What would you try if you were guaranteed to succeed? What big thoughts move your heart into a state of excitement and joy? When you answer these questions you will feel great and you will be in the “dream zone.” It is only when we get to this point that we experience what our dreams are.

Write down all of your dreams as you have them. Don’t think of any as too outlandish or foolish—remember—you’re dreaming! Let the thoughts fly and take careful record.

Now, prioritize those dreams. Which are most important? Which are most feasible? Which would you love to do the most? Put them in the order in which you will actually try to attain them. Remember, we are always moving toward action—not just dreaming.

3. Make your goals S.M.A.R.T.
The acronym S.M.A.R.T. means Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Time-sensitive.

Specific:
Goals are no place to waffle. They are no place to be vague. Ambiguous goals produce ambiguous results. Incomplete goals produce incomplete futures.

Measurable:
Always set goals that are measurable. I would say “specifically measurable” to take into account our principle of being specific.

Attainable:
One of the detrimental things that many people do—with good intentions—is setting goals that are so high that they are unattainable.

Realistic:
The root word of realistic is “real.” A goal has to be something that we can reasonably make “real” or a “reality” in our lives. There are some goals that are simply not realistic. You have to be able to say, even if it is a tremendously stretching goal, that yes, indeed, it is entirely realistic—that you could make it. You may even have to say that it will take x, y and z to do it, but if those happen, then it can be done. This is in no way to say it shouldn’t be a big goal, but it must be realistic.

Time:
Every goal should have a time frame attached to it. One of the powerful aspects of a great goal is that it has an end—a time in which you are shooting to accomplish it. As time goes by, you work on it because you don’t want to get behind, and you work diligently because you want to meet the deadline. You may even have to break down a big goal into different parts of measurement and time frames—that is OK. Set smaller goals and work them out in their own time. A S.M.A.R.T. goal has a timeline.

4. Have accountability.
When someone knows what your goals are, they hold you accountable by asking you to “give an account” of where you are in the process of achieving that goal. Accountability puts some teeth into the process. If a goal is set and only one person knows it, does it really have any power? Many times, no. A goal isn’t as powerful if you don’t have one or more people who can hold you accountable to it.

Nov 27

12 Sneaky Reasons You’re Always Tired

Coppell Trainer Tip

12 Sneaky Reasons You’re Always Tired

This goes way beyond sleep, guys

Stayed up until 4 a.m. three nights in a row because you just discovered Friday Night Lights on Netflix? (We understand.) It’s pretty obvious why you’re feeling sluggish. But what if you’re getting proper rest each night and you still feel fatigued? Here are 12 possible factors that could be sapping you of energy.

1  You’re Dehydrated
Fact: You need water to keep everything—from your digestive system to your cognitive functions—operating properly. Not getting enough (at least eight glasses a day) can significantly slow you down and even affect your mood.

2  Or You’re Too Hydrated
This is more an issue of timing your intake, rather than cutting back. Chugging too much water right before bed will lead to sleep-disrupting bathroom runs throughout the night. Instead, sip steadily throughout the day and stop an hour before hitting the hay.

3  Your House Is a Mess
Studies have shown that a little order in your surroundings can help clear space in your mind. Know what’s good for getting a restful night of sleep? A Zen environment.

4  The Heat Is Too High
It’s tempting to crank up the heat as it gets colder outside, but you’re better off keeping your room temperature at a steady 65°F all year-round. This will ensure that you don’t wake up at 3 a.m. tossing and turning in your suddenly too warm sheets.

5  You Have Allergies
Along with the itchy eyes and drippy nose, allergies can make you feel sluggish. Add to that whatever meds you’re taking to relieve those symptoms and you’re pretty much the walking dead. Ask your doctor about non-drowsy alternatives, stat.

6  Your Sleep Schedule Is Off
Say you go to bed at 10 on weeknights, but stay up until 2 a.m. on weekends. Even if you get the same total hours of sleep every night, the difference in timing can throw your body off, leaving you sapped of energy come Monday.

7  You’re Going to Bed Angry
Had an argument with your partner? Resolve the issue instead of stewing silently as you turn out the lights. New studies have shown that this can greatly affect your quality of sleep.

8  Your Thyroid Is Underactive
Been feeling drained for quite some time? It could be a sign of an underactive thyroid, which makes you feel foggy and sluggish no matter how much sleep you’re getting. If the symptoms persist, ask your doctor.

9  You Need More Iron
Iron helps keep your blood moving and carries oxygen to your muscles. If you’re not getting 10 milligrams per day, you might feel slow and tired. Try adding iron-rich foods like spinach, beans and poultry to your diet, as well as a daily multivitamin.

10  It’s the Weather
If the change in seasons affects your mood, it could be seasonal affective disorder (or SAD). Exercise to get your endorphins flowing and sit in the sunlight for a few minutes every day for a dose of mood-boosting vitamin D. If symptoms persist, check with your doc.

11  You’re Not Getting Enough Sunlight
The sun is one of the most important external cues that your body depends on to regulate your circadian rhythms (aka your internal clock). Spend at least 30 minutes outside every day for better sleep.

12  You’re Overexposed to Artificial Light
Beyond the light emitted by your various screens, those little blinking ones on your DVR and Internet router can interfere with sleep. Remove extra light sources from your bedroom or cover them up before bed.

Nov 17

20 Ways to Stay Fit and Healthy This Thanksgiving

Coppell Trainer Tip

20 Ways to Stay Fit and Healthy This Thanksgiving

Here’s some serious food for thought: People probably consume 3,000 to 5,000 calories around the Thanksgiving table. Yikes. While eating often takes center stage during the holidays, that doesn’t mean we have to give up on good health. Check out these tips for a fit and healthy holiday, without sacrificing any flavor or fun.

Fitness

Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade doesn’t air all day. Skip crowding around the TV and try to fit in some fitness in (the more the merrier!).

1. Get outside.
Up early? Go for a walk or run to enjoy some pre-festivities alone time, or grab your favorite second cousin to catch up. For something a bit more competitive, round up a group of family or friends and hit the backyard or local park for some flag football. Don’t forget the Get You In Shape Turkey Bustin’ Workouts on Wednesday, Nov 23rd, Friday, Nov 25th and Saturday, Nov 26th at 8am. They are open to all, just register at www.coppellcharity.com.

Fitness Boot Camp Thanksgiving (40)

2. Do it fast.
Don’t have an hour to hit the gym? Don’t worry. Try an at-home circuit workout, Traveling ABC workout, a Tabata training, or a Workout of the Day. All take 20 minutes (or less!) to get in a good workout.

3. Split up the chores.
Everyday activities (like tidying up the family room) can burn more calories than you’d think. So offer to do the dishes or swiffer the floor—not only does it lend a hand, it gets you moving too!

4. Bust a move.
Nothing says family bonding more than a dance party. Gather a group, turn up the tunes, and get the blood flowing. It may help you digest all that stuffing too.

5. Find a turkey trot.
If up for the challenge, run a race Thanksgiving morning! Find a Turkey trot in your town (they range from a totally doable one-mile to 10K), sign up, and add crossing the finish line to your holiday to-do list.

Health

Before heading to the kitchen, keep these healthy tips in mind to enjoy the festive food without going overboard.

6. Eat in the a.m.
Skipping breakfast in order to “save your appetite” for dinner probably isn’t the best idea. Not breaking the fast ‘til the afternoon may lead to binging later on (read: four servings of mashed potatoes).

7. Hydrate.
Make sure to drink water throughout the day to stay hydrated. Not drinking enough H2O could spark hunger pangs, which may actually be thirst.

8. Go easy on the apps.
Cheese and crackers can happen any day of the year. Save your appetite (and calorie consumption!) for dinnertime.

9. Use a smaller plate.
Stick all those Thanksgiving sides on a smaller plate. Research shows it’ll help you eat 22 percent fewer calories, while a bigger plate of food may be licked clean, even if we’re not hungry.Coppell Fitness - Thanksgiving Workouts (35)

10. Dim the lights.
Studies suggest that eating in softer light may lead to consuming less food. So create a nice intimate ambiance that everyone will love.

11. Chew slowly.
How quickly we eat really does matter, research shows. In one study, fast eaters consumed around three ounces of food per minute, while slowpokes only ate about two ounces. Chewing slowly could mean less calories consumed, so take a chill pill when digging into the dinner plate.

12. Beware of dangerfoods.
Be careful with foods that aren’t as healthy as they seem. (Green bean casserole, anyone?) Gratins, mashed potatoes, and cranberry sauce may hide some sneaky ingredients high in fat and sugar.

13. Watch out for liquid calories.
Unfortunately, calories from alcohol can sneak up on us during the holidays. Go easy on the booze and stick to healthier cocktails like a vodka soda or Bloody Mary to avoid excess sugar.

14. Skip the seconds.
Wait 20 minutes (the amount of time it probably takes to feel full) before filling up the dinner plate again. Unless you’re really hungry, save some food for leftovers—the best part about Thanksgiving, right?

15. Don’t deny dessert.
The holidays shouldn’t be about restricting certain foods—just try to enjoy them in moderation! Stick to one slice of pie instead of going cold turkey at the dessert table.

Happiness

An overdose of family and food can be stressful. Here are some ways to feel rested, calm, and in control.

16. Inhale, exhale.
Stressed because you’re trying to clean up the living room and prep the turkey while entertaining seven cousins and skyping with Uncle Mike? Take six to 10 deep breaths or try breathing exercises to relax.

17. Write it down.
If choosing to count calories over the holidays, track your food in a journal or on myfitnesspal so you know how much you’re consuming. This will keep you in control of what and how much you’re actually eating.

18. Meditate.
Whether enduring too much family time or unable to resist eating a whole pumpkin pie (we get it), meditation can help lower stress levels. All you need is a few minutes and a quiet corner.

19. Get enough sleep.
Make sure to get seven to nine hours of sleep the night before Thanksgiving. Not getting enough sleep could amp up appetite levels the following day.

20. Give yourself some wiggle-room.
At the end of the day, Thanksgiving should be enjoyed with loved ones. Don’t stress about enjoying some good food with even better company!

BY LAURA SCHWECHERL FOR GREATIEST.COM (EDITED)
ERROR: 500 - Server encountered exception: java.lang.Exception: IP access not allowed